HE FOLLOWING MATERIAL IS CURRENTLY BEING UPDATED.

 

UNIT 10 - 

Monday, 11 Jan 2016, 10.30, Ćirilometodska 4, classroom no. II (ground floor, left)

Lecturer: Dr. sc. Melita Carević, LL.M.

Objectives:

to understand the main elements of the WTO case analysis, to develop critical assessment of the parties' arguments.

Reading:

                                                                                                                                                                        

 

 

THE FOLLOWING UNITS ARE BEING UPDATED

 

Unit 4  Non-pecuniary restrictions on the movement of goods -  Thursday, 20 November 2014, 9.30, Ćirilometodska 4, classroom no. VII (2nd floor)

Objectives: investigating the level of trade liberalisation in the area of non-pecuniary (non-fiscal) trade restrictions. Understanding that Art. 34 TFEU (ex Art. 28 EC) goes well beyond requiring non-discrimination and that ever since Dassonville and Cassis, it was clear that other types of obstacles to trade can also be prohibited. The interpretation of 28 EC (now Art. 34 TFEU) relies on the measure's effects on market access. In contrast, comparable WTO rules Arts. III, XI GATT do not go beyond the requirement of non-discrimination (as they do not even ban all types of discrimination, but instead only intentional discrimination). However, there are WTO cases concerning the TBT and SPS agreements which suggest that these agreements move beyond non-discrimination. .

Reading

- Presentation unit 3

Arts. 34-36 TFEU (ex Art. 28-30 EC) v. Arts. III:4, XI, XX GATT;

TBT and SPS Agreements;

EU cases:

8/74 Procureur du Roi v. Dassonville [1974] ECR 837;

- 120/78 Rewe-Zentrale AG v. Bundesmonopolverwaltung fur Branntwein [1979] ECR 649, Cassis de Dijon;

C-267-8/91 Criminal proceedings against Keck and Mithouard [1993] ECR I-609716;

Opinion of AG Kokott in C-142/05 Aklagaren v. Mickelsson & Roos;

GATT/WTO cases

US - Tuna/Dolphinunadopted GATT Panel report; see facts; paras 5.8-5.16, 7.1;

EC – Asbestos, AB Report, WT/DS135/AB/R, 12/03/2001; see facts, paras 88-141; 149-154.

EC Hormones, AB Report, WT/DS26/AB/R, WT/DS48/AB/R, 16 January 1998, see facts; paras 188-209.

- T. Perišin, Free Movement of Goods and Limits of Regulatory Autonomy in the EU and WTO, T.M.C. Asser Press, The Hague, 2008, p 17-80, 127-195: 

Unit 5 - 4 December 2014

Part 5.1. TBT and SPS Agreements

Part 5.2. Services

Part 5.1. TBT ans SPS Agreements

Objectives: Understanding that there are relatively narrow areas of WTO where its trade liberalisation goes beyond the requirement of non-protectionism and in this way slightly approaches the EU model.

The TBT and SPS agreements have a role in greater deregulation by requiring the removal of not only protecitionist measures, but also of other measures not based on science. For example, the case law has demonstrated that the SPS prevents, firstly, protectionism and, secondly, other unnecessary trade restrictions of two kinds: one kind are measures adopted for the achievement of a higher level of protection than provided for by the relevant international standard if these measures are not based on a risk assessment; and the other are measures maintained without being “objectively and rationally” connected with scientific evidence. Similarly, the TBT, apart from preventing protectionism, also prevents the adoption of national measures which are not based on an existing international standard if this standard is “effective or appropriate” in fulfilling that country’s legitimate objectives.

The TBT and SPS also have a role in promoting mutual recognition and international standardisation. 

Reading

TBT and SPS Agreements;

EC Hormones, AB Report, WT/DS26/AB/R, WT/DS48/AB/R, 16 January 1998, see facts; paras 188-209. 

EC Sardines, AB Report, WT/DS231/AB/R, 26 September 2002, see facts and legal provisions; paras 234-261;276-291.

- CJEU: Case C-171/11 Fra.bo (2012, nyr).


- T. Perišin, Free Movement of Goods and Limits of Regulatory Autonomy in the EU and WTO, T.M.C. Asser Press, The Hague, 2008, p 165-195:

Objectives: Examining the disciplines on trade-restrictive measures in the context of the EU free movement provisions and the WTO General Agreement on Trade in Services. Comparing the impact and significance of market access and domestic regulation in the context of services with the same problems in the context of trade in goods. Assessing the extent of services liberalization within the EU and WTO and pointing out the differences, such as the fact that the GATS depends largely on specific concessions by the Contracting Parties. Contrasting the seemingly wide scope of GATS disciplines with the deeper impact of EU rules.

Part 5.2. Services

Reading

- Presentation
Relevant Articles of the TFEU;
- The Services Directive [Directive 2006/123/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 12 December 2006 on services in the internal market, OJ L 376] (skim Arts. 1-3, 9-18)
- The GATS Agreement (skim the general part, skip the annexes)

EU cases:

C-55/94, Reinhard Gebhard v Consiglio dell'Ordine degli Avvocati e Procuratori di Milano [1995] ECR I-4165
C-384/93, Alpine Investments BV v Minister van Financiën [1995] ECR I-1141
C-36/02, Omega Spielhallen- und Automatenaufstellungs-GmbH v Oberbürgermeisterin der Bundesstadt Bonn [2004] ECR I-9609


GATS case

US-Gambling, AB Report, see facts; sectionVI, section VIIb and VIIc.
 
- C. Barnard, The Substantive Law of the EU, OUP, Oxford, 2007, pp 308-310; 354-408.
- WTO GATS Training Module

 

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Unit - Visiting Guest Professor - James Flett, European Commission, Legal Service, WTO Team; Wednesday, 14 January 2015, 17.00

 

- CLASSROOM NO. VII, CIRILOMETODSKA 4, 2ND FLOOR

EXTERNAL EFFECTS OF THE INTERNAL MARKET - WTO CHALLENGES TO EU SANITARY AND PHYTOSANITARY MEASURES

 

Reading:

P. Van de Bossche, W. Zdouc, The Law and Policy of the World Trade Organization, Chapter 14 (Sanitary and phytosanitary measures) - but only pages 894 to 932. - available on the e-learning site.

 

Unit - Visiting Guest Professor - James Flett, European Commission, Legal Service, WTO Team; Thursday, 15 January 2015, 9.30

- CLASSROOM NO. I, (AS USUAL) 

GREEN SUBSIDIES - FIT v. PreussenElektra

 

Reading: 

P. Van de Bossche, W. Zdouc, The Law and Policy of the World Trade Organization, Chapter 12 (Subsidies) - but only pages 744 to 813.  - available on the e-learning site.

Appellate Body Reports, Canada - Renewable Energy/Canada - Feed-In Tariff Program, pages 117 to 140.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guest Speaker: Ms. Gordana Topić, LLM - European Commission, DG Environment

 

Objectives: understading the external effects of internal measures - examining this issue on the example of the EU's Seal Products Regulation. This Regulation has been challenged both in the EU and in the WTO, and it has consequntly been amended.

 

Reading: 

- T. Perišin, Is the EU Seal Products Regulation a Sealed Deal? EU and WTO Challenges

WTO EC - Seal Products dispute

Seal Products Regulation - NEW (changed version after the WTO dispute)

   ****

Unit 4 - External effects of EU passanger rights in air transport

Wednesday. 25 Nov 2015, 17.30-19.00, classroom tbc

 

Guest professor: 

Prof. Derrick Wyatt, QC

University of Oxford                                                                                                                                                                 

 

Unit 6 – The EU as a party in WTO disputes: an inside look

Monday, 30 Nov 2015, 10.30, Ćirilometodska 4, classroom no. II (ground floor, left)

 

Guest speaker:

Dr. Mislav Mataija, LLM

European Commission Legal Service - WTO Team

 

Reading:

- T. Perišin, EU Identity from the Perspective of the WTO – The Spillover Effects of the Union’s Internal Market in the International Trading Arena

see organisation of the European Commission Legal Service

                                                                                                                                                          


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